IMG_2092I am admittedly not a huge fan of the New Year’s resolution. For years, I’ve sworn off the whole practice. Why bother making an arbitrary goal dictated by some calendar date society deems to be important, leaving it in the hands of fate, knowing in your heart that failure and disappointment will naturally ensue? No, thanks. I’ll settle for the status quo, at least that way, I’ll know what to expect!

This past year, however, I’ve decided to revisit the whole idea. Perhaps, there is value in a yearly examination of one’s current state of affairs. Resolutions can serve as powerful, transformative intent statements that acknowledge something about the status quo that needs a rework and set a new course for the future.

Reflective practice can be a clarifying tool which allows us craft the lives we wish to be living, but intent alone is not enough to achieve success. We have to be willing to ask ourselves difficult questions, identify and challenge our limiting beliefs about what we can achieve, and commit ourselves to our mission, despite the inevitable adversity along the journey. We also have to be willing to digest and acknowledge our progress and successes in order for the process to feel authentic, positive, and worthwhile.

The following is a delineation of my end-of-year reflection process:

My hope, if you’re a skeptic like me, is that you might consider revisiting the exercise too, not for my benefit, but for yours…so that you might give yourself permission to explore your dreams and goals, knowing that you’re worthy of doing so.  

For this activity, I brought out my trusty journal, the same one that lives beside my bed at night, on the counter throughout the day, in my purse when I’m out-and-about…you get the idea (big-time nerd alert…I know). There’s something about the process of journaling that brings clarity and insight to situations, conflicts, or decisions that might otherwise seem so convoluted and complicated. And bonus- studies have shown that you are 42% more likely to achieve goals when you write them down. So, really, it’s a win-win!

1. Start by acknowledging your successes and triumphs

Instead of delving straight into the all-too-familiar, critical “what needs to change” mindset, focus on the positive progress you’ve made by asking:

What did I do/create/make happen/experience this year that I’m really proud of?

2. Set your intention

Ask yourself: What I really want is…?

This year, conscious of my tendency for certainty-seeking and perfectionism, I set the intention of actively inviting play into my life for 2018. I want to embrace spontaneity, uncertainty, and challenge myself to lean into that which is uncomfortable. Play, as Dr. Shimi Kang identifies in her TED talk, is the antidote to perfectionism. Sign me up!

3. Find your Why

Next, ask yourself: Why do I want this? How will this have impact?

I subscribe to the belief that we are all guided by 6 main emotional needs (certainty, variety, significance, belonging, progress, and contribution). I believe that our resolutions directly relate to those needs. When we become aware of our goals within the context of our emotional needs, the WHY becomes clearer. It’s easier to find motivation to stick to a goal when we understand how it’ll meet our emotional needs. Sometimes, by examining the underlying motivation, we might find ourselves re-evaluating the goal entirely in order to maintain our integrity.

For example, many people make the resolution to lose weight. Some do it so they can keep up with young children (belonging/love). Some do it so they can create a healthier life-style to lengthen their lives (certainty). Some do it so that they can fit into the media-driven model of what people should look like (significance or belonging). Some people do it because they want to challenge themselves (progress). When your why is strong, your dedication will become unshakeable.

4. Surviving the dip: Examine your limiting beliefs

In a world driven by instant gratification, we are attracted to the concept of the New Year’s Resolution, the magic-pill that promises lasting change with none of the challenge. However, casual goal-setting can’t work without the support of a compelling framework that holds us accountable, that pulls us through the inevitable dip. Seth Godin, acclaimed author and entrepreneur, asserts that this is the part where anything you’re working towards gets hard. It’s the point at which your subconscious finds every excuse to quit, give up, avoid the task, get “too busy”…make excuses.” It comes for everyone…no one is exempt from the pain of the dip. Willpower alone is not enough to affect positive change and get you through this period of self-doubt. When people rely on willpower, they often wind up in a battle of wills against themselves…and they lose, every time.

As speaker and author Mel Robbins says, “motivation is garbage.” Our propensity for hesitation works against our willpower. Hesitation protects us from perceived dangers, risks, and new experiences that push us beyond our comfortable habits. Often, there are subconscious inner conflicts at work, based on limiting beliefs about yourself or your identity that prevent you from achieving that which you want to do. Once you identify those forces or beliefs, then systematically challenge them, procrastination, avoidance, fear, and anxiety (all mechanisms designed to protect us from the pain of failure) can retreat, leaving you to your goal.

So, you have to see the dip coming, through the optimism of your goal-setting, and be prepared with one heck of a persuasive argument for when it knocks on your doorstep.

Ask yourself: What’s stopping me?

Make an exhaustive list of your favourite excuses, so you’ll see them coming a mile away.

Here are some of my favourite excuses (messy writing and all!) :

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5. Magic 20-No Matter What (NMW)

Now that you’ve got an comprehensive list of limiting (generally untrue) beliefs or excuses that your unconscious mind might employ to sabotage your efforts, make a counter-list of 20 ways you might be able to reach your goal NO MATTER WHAT! It’s crazy, but it works. Regardless of which external factors pop into your life, they won’t be able to jeopardize your goal because it means so much to you: your WHY is strong and so are your NMW reasons!

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6. Celebrate!

Go on and celebrate even the tiniest move in your desired direction.

Recently over the holidays, one of my best friends, my husband, and I were sitting in a hot tub overlooking the beautiful white carpet of freshly fallen, untouched snow, sparkling in the light of the full moon. During conversation, my friend mentioned repeatedly how fun it would be to jump into the snow and wished someone would just “do it!” A year ago, I would have vehemently resisted and avoided the adventure at all costs.

This time, something about it seemed intriguing…an opportunity for play! So, without allowing hesitation a chance to talk me out of it, I looked my friend dead in her eyes and challenged her: “If you’ll do it, I’ll do it!” And we did!

There we were, two thirty-something moms of little ones, throwing caution and reason to the wind like children would. We hopped out of the hot tub, giggling and squealing uncontrollably, ran through the snow in bare feet, rolled in the snow in wet bathing suits, sprinted and vaulted ourselves back into the respite of warm water, skin tingling, screaming…alive and, honestly, kind of proud. This was play at work. I could totally do this.

 

Happy New Year! Let me know how you approach you New Year!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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